2022 MIT Energy Initiative Annual Research Conference

Navigating the energy transition: Tackling energy security, materials availability, and other concerns to reach decarbonization goals

September 13-14, 2022
Hybrid event

MITEI’s Annual Research Conference seeks to frame the key technology, policy, and economic drivers that are shaping today’s energy system and its future. This year’s conference looks at the race to decarbonize and how energy security concerns and materials availability may impact the energy transition. Topics we will explore include the energy transition on a global scale, the future of the power markets, the challenge of scaling energy startups, carbon removal technologies, and monitoring and mitigating non-CO2 greenhouse gases. We will review promising discoveries from MITEI’s Seed Fund program, which supports innovative early-stage research, as well as findings from the recently released The Future of Energy Storage report.

Please note that some of the sessions at the Annual Research Conference only be available for in-person participation.

MIT Media Lab (E14), 6th floor | 75 Amherst St, Cambridge, MA

Questions? Contact MITEI Member Services.



Schedule

Tuesday, September 13
All times are listed in Eastern time.
7:30-8:15 am Registration and breakfast
8:15-8:30 am Welcome and opening remarks
Robert C. Armstrong, Director, MIT Energy Initiative; Chevron Professor of Chemical Engineering
8:30-10:00 am The world facing multiple crises and what it means for the energy transition
This session examines the variety of crises—including energy security, a lingering pandemic, disrupted supply chains, and inflation—that may slow our response to climate change.

Keynote presentation by Ernest J. Moniz, Cecil and Ida Green Professor of Physics and Engineering Systems Emeritus, MIT; Thirteenth United States Secretary of Energy

Panel moderator: Robert Stoner, Deputy Direct for Science and Technology, MIT Energy Initiative
Speakers:
M. Taylor Fravel, Arthur and Ruth Sloan Professor of Political Science, MIT Department of Political Science; Director, MIT Security Studies Program
Yasheng Huang, Epoch Foundation Professor of Global Economics and Management, MIT Sloan School of Management
Meghan L. O’Sullivan, Jeane Kirkpatrick Professor of International Affairs, Harvard University’s Kennedy School; Partner, Macro Advisory Partners
John E. Parsons, Deputy Director for Research, MIT Center for Energy and Environmental Policy Research

10:00-10:30 am Break
10:30 am-12:00 pm What is the role of CCUS in getting to net zero by 2050?

Moderator:
Bradford Hager, Cecil and Ida Green Professor of Earth Sciences, MIT Department of Earth, Atmospheric and Planetary Sciences

Discussion with Charles Harvey, Professor, MIT Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering and Howard Herzog, Senior Research Engineer, MIT Energy Initiative

Panel presentation:

Speakers
David Keith, Gordon McKay Professor of Applied Physics, Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences, and Professor of Public Policy, Harvard Kennedy School
Timothy Krysiek, Managing Director, Equinor Ventures
Jennifer Morris, Principal Research Scientist, MIT Energy Initiative and MIT Joint Program on the Science and Policy of Global Change
Yogesh Surendranath, Associate Professor, MIT Department of Chemistry
Kripa K. Varanasi, Professor, MIT Department of Mechanical Engineering

12:00-1:30 pm Networking lunch and viewing of student posters
1:30-2:45 pm The future of power markets in a low marginal cost world
The session explores the economic, technological, and policy drivers of declining marginal costs of generation, the inherent characteristics of different generation resources, and the role of market and policy design in improving economic efficiency and creating incentives for long-term investments.

Moderator: Christopher Knittel, Deputy Director for Policy, MIT Energy Initiative; George P. Shultz Professor of Energy Economics, MIT Sloan School of Management; Director, MIT Center for Energy and Environmental Policy Research
Speakers:
Anuradha Annaswamy, Founder and Director, Active-Adaptive Control Laboratory, MIT; Senior Research Scientist, MIT Department of Mechanical Engineering
Paul Joskow, Elizabeth and James Killian Professor of Economics and Management, MIT Department of Economics; President emeritus, Alfred P. Sloan Foundation
Tim Schittekatte, Postdoctoral Associate, MIT Sloan School of Management
Louis Vézina, Head of Market Intelligence and Expertise, Hydro-Québec

2:45-3:00 pm Break
3:00-4:15 pm The challenge of scaling new energy startups
Long lead times and capital intensity have long been understood to be inherent challenges for energy startups. How are the best companies navigating the challenge of taking their technology from the lab to the market?

Moderator: Fiona Murray, William Porter (1967) Professor of Entrepreneurship, MIT Sloan School of Management; Associate Dean of Innovation and Inclusion, MIT

Speakers:
Aura Cuellar, Vice President Energy Transition, Shell
Joy Dunn, Vice President of Operations, Commonwealth Fusion Systems
Michael Kearney, Partner, The Engine
Hooisweng Ow, Technology Principal, Eni Next LLC
Libby Wayman, Partner, Breakthrough Energy Ventures

4:15-5:15 pm Startup showcase
This panel will look at energy startups, seeing how the best companies are navigating the challenge of taking their technology from the lab to the market. We will feature companies at various stages of development and discuss the value of partners throughout each part of the process.

Moderator: Louis Carranza, Associate Director, MIT Energy Initiative

Abigail Jablansky, Business Development Lead, Amogy
Marco Ferrara, Co-founder and Senior Vice President, Software and Analytics, Form Energy
Cameron Halliday, Co-founder and CEO, Mantel
Francesco M. Benedetti, Co-founder and CEO, Osmoses, Inc.
Carlos Araque, Co-founder and CEO, Quaise Energy
Ross Bonner, CTO, Transaera
Jonte Boysen, Head of Business Development, Verdox
Shreya Dave, Co-founder and CEO, Via Separations
Tonio Buonassisi, Co-founder and Scientific Advisor, Xinterra; Professor, MIT Department of Mechanical Engineering

5:15 pm Networking reception
For in-person attendees
Wednesday, September 14
All times are listed in Eastern time.
7:45-8:45 am Registration and breakfast
7:45-8:45 am Discussion with MITEI Education team: What should undergraduate education look like?
For in-person attendees
The energy transition needs a range of different skill sets and knowledge bases. Based on these needs, what should undergraduate energy education look like? The MITEI Education Office wants to hear your ideas and recommendations. Please join us for breakfast and a conversation about how undergraduate energy education should evolve in the next five years.
8:45 am Welcome day 2
8:45-10:00 am The future of energy storage
This session explores the role that energy storage can play in fighting climate change and in the global adoption of clean energy grids.

Moderator: Robert C. Armstrong, Director, MIT Energy Initiative; Chevron Professor of Chemical Engineering

Speakers:
Fikile Brushett, Associate Professor, MIT Department of Chemical Engineering
Dharik Mallapragada, Principal Research Scientist, MIT Energy Initiative
Elsa Olivetti, Esther and Harold E. Edgerton Career Development Professor, MIT Department of Materials Science and Engineering; Co-Director, MIT Climate and Sustainability Consortium
Richard Schmalensee, Professor of Economics, Emeritus, MIT Department of Economics; Dean and Howard W. Johnson Professor of Management, Emeritus, MIT Sloan School of Management

10:00-11:00 am Clean energy supply chain: Materials availability and security
Historically, access to resources has been a key concern of the energy industry and a key driver of international diplomacy. Now, as countries scramble to secure clean energy supply chains, including access to materials, how will the world allocate these scarce resources and are there enough to get us to net zero?

Moderator: Robert L. Jaffe, Jane and Otto Morningstar Professor of Science, Post-Tenure, MIT Department of Physics
Speakers:
Elsa Olivetti, Esther and Harold E. Edgerton Career Development Professor, MIT Department of Materials Science and Engineering; Co-Director, MIT Climate and Sustainability Consortium
Arvind Sanger, Founder and Managing Partner, Geosphere Capital
Stuart Watson, Chief Adviser, Office of the Chief Scientist, Development and Technology, Rio Tinto

11:00 am-12:00 pm Student poster session
For in-person attendees
Attendees will have the opportunity to learn about students’ research and discuss various energy topics during the poster session.
12:00-1:30 pm Lunch and viewing of student posters
1:30-2:45 pm MITEI General Seed Fund Project annual check-up
Over the past 16 years, MITEI, with the support of our member companies and private donors, has made 203 seed fund awards totaling more than $28 million. Proposals across the entire spectrum of energy and related climate research are welcome, including science, technology, and social sciences. Awards have funded principal investigators from 29 departments, all five schools, the College of Computing, and programs under the aegis of the Vice President of Research’s Office. Submissions are encouraged from all disciplines. This session features projects from recent awardees.

Moderator: Antje Danielson, Director of Education, MIT Energy Initiative

Speakers:
Chuchu Fan, Wilson Assistant Professor of Aeronautics and Astronautics, MIT Department of Aeronautics and Astronautics presenting on Design automation of safe, robust, and resilient distributed power systems
Michael Howland, Esther and Harold E. Edgerton Assistant Professor, MIT Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering presenting on Robust wind farm siting and design under climate change-driven wind resource uncertainty
Namrata Kala, Assistant Professor, Applied Economics, MIT Sloan School of Management presenting on Socio-economic impacts of clean electrification: A randomized control design
Caitlin Mueller, Associate Professor, MIT Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering and MIT Department of Architecture presenting on Low-energy thermal comfort for buildings in the global south: Optimal design of integrated structural thermal systems

2:45-3:00 pm Break
3:00-3:30 pm Keynote discussion with Coordinating Minister for Maritime Affairs and Investment of the Republic of Indonesia Luhut Binsar Pandjaitan and Robert C. Armstrong, Director, MIT Energy Initiative; Chevron Professor of Chemical Engineering
3:30-4:45 pm Monitoring and mitigating non-CO2 greenhouse gases
Carbon dioxide emissions as a contributor to climate change have been the primary concern of industry, academia, and the general public. However, other emissions contributing to global warming include methane, nitrous oxide, fluorinated gases, aerosols, and other pollutants. How should we measure the impact of these non-CO2 contributors and how can they be mitigated?

Moderator: Jennifer Morris, Principal Research Scientist, MIT Energy Initiative and MIT Joint Program on the Science and Policy of Global Change

Speakers:
William H. Green, Hoyt C. Hottel Professor in Chemical Engineering, Postdoctoral Officer, MIT
Steven Hamburg, Chief Scientist and Senior Vice President, Environmental Defense Fund
Desirée L. Plata, Associate Professor, MIT Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering
Timothy Swager, John D. MacArthur Professor of Chemistry, MIT Department of Chemistry

4:45 pm Reception and Dinner for the Society of Energy Fellows
For in-person attendees
Samberg Conference Center (E52), 50 Memorial Drive, 7th floor, Salons T and West

Download the agenda.



About the speakers

Anuradha Annaswamy

Founder and Director, Active-Adaptive Control Laboratory, MIT; Senior Research Scientist, MIT Department of Mechanical Engineering
Anuradha Annaswamy is founder and director of the Active-Adaptive Control Laboratory in the Department of Mechanical Engineering at MIT. Her research interests span adaptive control theory and its applications to aerospace, automotive, propulsion, and energy systems as well as cyber physical systems such as Smart Grids, Smart Cities, and Smart Infrastructures. She has received best paper awards (Axelby; CSM), as well as Distinguished Member and Distinguished Lecturer awards from the IEEE Control Systems Society (CSS) and a Presidential Young Investigator award from NSF. She is a fellow of IEEE and International Federation of Automatic Control. She is the recipient of the Distinguished Alumni award from Indian Institute of Science for 2021.

Annaswamy is the author of a graduate textbook on adaptive control, co-editor of two vision documents on smart grids as well as two editions of the Impact of Control Technology report, a coauthor of a 2021 National Academy of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine (NASEM) Committee report on the Future of Electric Power in the United States, and a member of another NASEM study on the role of net-metering in the evolving electricity system. She served as the president of CSS in 2020. She has been serving as a faculty lead in the Electric Power Systems workstream in the MIT Future Energy Systems Center since September 2021.

Carlos Araque

Co-founder and CEO, Quaise Energy
Carlos Araque is the co-founder and CEO of Quaise Energy, the company working to unlock the heat beneath our feet at the terawatt scale, a feat that could ultimately power the world with clean energy. To make that energy—supercritical geothermal energy—available to all, Araque is leveraging his considerable experience solving difficult technical challenges in the oil industry for Schlumberger and as technical director for The Engine, MIT’s groundbreaking fund and platform to commercialize world-changing technologies. Araque believes that supercritical geothermal energy has the potential to replace fossil fuels as the world’s dominant energy source.

Robert C. Armstrong

Director, MIT Energy Initiative; Chevron Professor of Chemical Engineering, MIT
Robert C. Armstrong directs the MIT Energy Initiative, an Institute-wide effort at MIT linking science, technology, and policy to transform the world’s energy systems. A member of the MIT faculty since 1973, Armstrong served as head of the Department of Chemical Engineering from 1996 to 2007. He was appointed as director of MITEI in 2013, after serving as the organization’s deputy director from 2007-2013 with founding director Ernest Moniz. His research is focused on pathways to a low-carbon energy future.

Armstrong has been elected into the American Academy of Arts and Sciences (2020) and the National Academy of Engineering (2008). He received the 2006 Bingham Medal from the Society of Rheology, which is devoted to the study of the science of deformation and flow of matter, and the Founders Award (2020), Warren K. Lewis Award(2006), and the Professional Progress Award (1992) from the American Institute of Chemical Engineers.

Armstrong chaired the recent MIT’s The Future of Energy Storage study and was a member of MIT’s Future of Natural Gas and Future of Solar Energy study groups. He advised the teams that developed MITEI’s recent reports, The Future of Nuclear Energy in a Carbon-Constrained World (2018) and Insights into Future Mobility (2019). He co-edited Game Changers: Energy on the Move with former U.S. Secretary of State George P. Shultz.

Francesco M. Benedetti

Co-founder and CEO, Osmoses, Inc.
Francesco M. Benedetti is a co-founder and serves as chief executive officer and Board Member at Osmoses, Inc. He earned his PhD in chemical engineering from the University of Bologna, Italy, and worked as a postdoctoral associate at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Benedetti received a 2019/2020 MIT Energy Fellowship, a 2021 Activate Fellowship, and was an NSF I-Corps Entrepreneurial Lead in 2021.

Osmoses won the MIT $100k Entrepreneurship Competition in 2021, the 2021 Cleantech Open Northeast Accelerator, the Carbon Sequestration Prize, and in November 2021 closed a $3 million Pre-Seed round of financing backed by top national venture capital firms. In early 2022 Osmoses was awarded ARPA-E SEED funds and InnovateMass grant to further develop the technology and paths to commercialization.

Ross Bonner

CTO, Transaera
Ross Bonner is the CTO of Transaera, a startup developing a new class of ultra-efficient air conditioning systems. Transaera is on a mission to cut the cost of ownership of air conditioners by more than half using a combination of novel materials and systems. Bonner is the principal inventor of Transaera’s enabling technology, which uses materials with nano-scale pores to remove moisture from the air, dramatically reducing the energy consumption of air conditioning.
Prior to joining Transaera, he worked as a design engineer for GE aviation. He earned an MS in mechanical engineering from MIT with a thesis on high efficiency desiccant-based dehumidification and cooling.

Jonte Boysen

Head of Business Development, Verdox
Jonte Boysen is the head of Business Development at Verdox. Boysen was a strategy consultant for financial institutions before pivoting into the carbon removal space. He advised some of the largest North American and Australian banks on corporate investment prioritization as well as marketing, sales, and distribution strategy. Boysen holds an MBA from The Wharton School and an MA in international studies with a focus on Africa from the University of Pennsylvania. He received his Bachelor’s degree in industrial engineering from the University of Toronto.

Fikile Brushett

Associate Professor, MIT Department of Chemical Engineering
Fikile Brushett is an associate professor in the Department of Chemical Engineering at MIT. He received his BSE in chemical & biomolecular engineering from the University of Pennsylvania in 2006 and his PhD in chemical engineering from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign in 2010 under the supervision of Professor Paul J. A. Kenis. From 2010-2012, he was a director’s postdoctoral fellow in the Electrochemical Energy Storage Group at Argonne National Laboratory under the supervision of Dr. John T. Vaughey. In 2012, he started his independent career at MIT where his research group seeks to advance the science and engineering of electrochemical technologies for a sustainable energy economy. Brushett is especially interested in the fundamental processes that define the performance, cost, and lifetime of present day and future electrochemical systems. His group currently works on redox flow batteries for grid storage and on electrochemical processes for carbon management and chemical manufacturing. He also serves as the research integration co-lead for the Joint Center for Energy Storage Research, a DOE-funded Energy Innovation Hub.

Tonio Buonassisi

Co-founder and Scientific Advisor, Xinterra, Professor, MIT Department of Mechanical Engineering
Tonio Buonassisi (MechE) combines machine learning and high-throughput experiments to create new materials & systems with societally beneficial applications. His early-career research in solar energy and technoeconomic analysis assisted dozens of companies, and earned him a PECASE bestowed by President Obama. In 2018 he served as founding director of the Accelerated Materials Development for Manufacturing (AMDM) programme in Singapore, a S$24.7M effort to accelerate the rate of novel materials development by >10x. He co-founded Xinterra in 2021 to bring this vision to market. He returned to MIT full time in December 2021, where he is now launching the Accelerated Materials Laboratory for Sustainability.

Louis Carranza

Associate Director, MIT Energy Initiative
Louis Carranza is the associate director of the MIT Energy Initiative, where he oversees MITEI’s membership programs and industry engagement, including member recruitment. Carranza spearheaded the development of eight Low-Carbon Energy Centers as part of the Institute’s Climate Action Plan and currently serves as advisor to the MIT Energy Club. He has been a judge for the MIT 100K Business Plan competition, the MIT Clean Energy Entrepreneur Prize, and the MIT Energy Hackathon. Carranza was previously vice president for strategic development at IHS, where he also served as executive director and co-chair of CERAWeek, a leading energy conference. He co-led the IHS Global Scenarios Initiative, which developed scenarios for the energy, automotive, aerospace, and defense industries. Earlier at Cambridge Energy Research Associates, Carranza was co-director of the CERA’s Global Power Forum. Prior to CERA, he was at the World Economic Development Congress, where he led the firm’s energy and water activities. He was also project advisor to Gasoline and the American People, a study of US gasoline consumers and markets. He was a contributor to Game Changers: Energy on the Move, a joint MIT and Stanford report, and contributing author of MIT’s 2019 paper on Climate Related Financial Disclosures.

Aura Cuellar

Vice President Energy Transition, Shell
From environmental engineer to senior business leader, Aura Cuellar is determined to lead the energy industry through a transformation toward more sustainable business practices and lower-carbon energy solutions. She is currently the vice president of Energy Transition for Shell in the United States, responsible for the implementation of Shell USA’s energy transition strategy. With experience living and working in Europe, Africa, Asia and North and South America, Cuellar brings diverse perspectives and appreciation for global and regional approaches to combat climate change.

Cuellar’s experience includes roles in downstream and capital projects, where she was responsible for extensive commercial negotiations, operations management, and the development of strategic capital portfolios. Cuellar’s leadership was forged by various senior roles in operating and manufacturing assets and through engagement with external partners and customers. She is passionate about building integrated and robust teams that thrive on culture and identity and in which people are empowered and accountable to deliver commercial results.

Cuellar holds a bachelor’s degree in environmental and civil engineering, an MBA, and recently finished Executive General Management studies at INSEAD. Originally from Colombia, Cuellar currently lives in Houston with her husband and two young boys and enjoys reading, traveling, and long-distance running.

Antje Danielson

Director of Education, MIT Energy Initiative
Antje Danielson is the director of education at the MIT Energy Initiative where she directs existing energy programs, such as the MIT Energy Studies Minor and the Energy Fellows Program, conceives and oversees the development of new programs, such as the Future of Energy Systems online MicroMasters, and engages in interdisciplinary research related to transformation systems. She co-teaches energy and climate related classes and leverages her extensive international network of like-minded academic and professional colleagues to accelerate climate change related capacity building.

Prior to her position at MIT, she directed the Institute of the Environment at Tufts University where she was also an assistant professor in the Department of Public Health. From 2005 to 2008, she was the deputy director for sustainability at the Centre for Research into Earth Energy Systems at Durham University in the UK, where she initiated a carbon capture and storage working group.

Danielson’s approach to finding climate solutions is systemic, interdisciplinary, collaborative, and entrepreneurial. She advances her goals through research, education, and implementation of solutions. In 1999/2000 she co-founded the car-sharing company Zipcar.

Danielson is a member of the Board of Directors of the Global Council for Science and the Environment and has also served as president of the US Council for Environmental Deans and Directors. She received teaching awards from Harvard University and an Exceptional Contribution Award from Durham University.

Shreya Dave

Co-founder and CEO, Via Separations
Shreya Dave is the co-founder & CEO of Via Separations, an MIT spinout dedicated to reducing the emissions in industrial manufacturing. Via is a venture-capital backed company that was recognized as one of C&EN’s 10 startups to watch in 2019, and has received awards from ARPA-E, NSF, and MassCEC. Dave was awarded Technology Review’s 35 Innovators under 35 in 2018. Dave holds Bachelors, Masters’ and Doctoral degrees from MIT in mechanical engineering and technology & policy. She also enjoys serving on MIT’s Corporate Development Committee, the board of directors for Greentown Labs, and lecturing in MIT’s product design and development course, 2.009.

Joy Dunn

Vice President of Operations, Commonwealth Fusion Systems
Joy Dunn is the vice president of Operations at Commonwealth Fusion Systems (CFS), a clean energy startup based in Cambridge, MA, where she is responsible for the company’s day-to-day operations including manufacturing, construction and facilities, safety, and quality. Supported by the world’s leading investors and a collaborative partnership with MIT’s Plasma Science and Fusion Center, the CFS team is driven by the climate change crisis to develop the fastest path to commercial fusion energy. In her previous role as head of Manufacturing, Dunn led the production of the world’s largest high-temperature superconducting magnet which successfully demonstrated the key technology needed to enable net-positive fusion energy. Before joining the CFS team in early 2019, Dunn spent a decade at SpaceX developing and manufacturing the Dragon spacecraft to deliver cargo and astronauts to the International Space Station. Dunn also co-founded both the Women’s Network and LGBTQ employee interest groups at SpaceX and she is actively involved in STEM outreach events, including sitting on the Board of Directors for Out For Undergrad, a non-profit that helps LGBTQ students reach their full potential. She was also named to Business Insider’s list of the Most Powerful Female Engineers of 2017 and to the World Economic Forum’s Young Global Leaders in 2018. Dunn received her BS in aerospace engineering from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

Chuchu Fan

Wilson Assistant Professor of Aeronautics and Astronautics, MIT Department of Aeronautics and Astronautics
Chuchu Fan is an assistant professor in the Department of Aeronautics and Astronautics at MIT. Before that, she was a postdoc researcher at Caltech and got her PhD from the Electrical and Computer Engineering Department at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign in 2019. She earned her bachelor’s degree from Tsinghua University, Department of Automation. Her group at MIT works on using rigorous mathematics including formal methods, machine learning, and control theory for the design, analysis, and verification of safe autonomous systems. Fan’s dissertation work “Formal methods for safe autonomy” won the ACM Doctoral Dissertation Award in 2020.

Marco Ferrara

Co-founder and Senior Vice President, Software and Analytics Form Energy
Marco Ferrara, PhD, is co-founder and senior vice president of Software and Analytics at Form Energy, where he supervises application analytics and product and business development of Form’s multi-day, ultra-low cost electrical storage platform. Prior to Form, Ferrara was VP of Energy Analytics and Optimization at IHI Inc., where he led research and development of electrical storage optimal configuration and control software. Ferrara started his career in energy storage at 24M Technologies, where he created the industry leading software ESWare™, which was subsequently acquired by IHI. An engineer by training and entrepreneurial thinker, Ferrara has been involved in the development and commercialization of innovative hardware and software technologies in several energy ventures. Early in his career, Ferrara was a lead developer of the portfolio valuation software at Edison Mission Marketing and Trading. Ferrara holds a PhD in nuclear engineering from MIT and a PhD in electrical engineering and computer science from the University of L’Aquila, in his native Italy.

M. Taylor Fravel

Arthur and Ruth Sloan Professor of Political Science, MIT Department of Political Science; Director, MIT Security Studies Program
M. Taylor Fravel is the Arthur and Ruth Sloan Professor of Political Science and director of the Security Studies Program at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Fravel studies international relations, with a focus on international security, China, and East Asia. His books include Strong Borders, Secure Nation: Cooperation and Conflict in China’s Territorial Disputes, (Princeton University Press, 2008) and Active Defense: China’s Military Strategy Since 1949 (Princeton University Press, 2019). His other publications have appeared in International Security, Foreign Affairs, Security Studies, International Studies Review, The China Quarterly, The Washington Quarterly, Journal of Strategic Studies, Armed Forces & Society, Current History, Asian Survey, Asian Security, China Leadership Monitor, and Contemporary Southeast Asia. Fravel is a graduate of Middlebury College and Stanford University, where he received his PhD. He also has graduate degrees from the London School of Economics and Oxford University, where he was a Rhodes Scholar. In 2016, he was named an Andrew Carnegie Fellow by the Carnegie Corporation. Fravel has been a member of the board of directors of the National Committee on U.S.-China Relations and serves as the principal investigator for the Maritime Awareness Project.

William H. Green

Hoyt C. Hottel Professor in Chemical Engineering,Postdoctoral Officer, MIT
William H. Green is a world leader in chemical reaction engineering, and he has led many research projects related to fuels, combustion, and pyrolysis. He is well known for developing computer methods to predict the behavior of complicated reacting mixtures. He also invents numerical methods, including methods for machine learning in chemistry. He also invents and analyzes technologies to reduce greenhouse gas emissions; two of his patents are now being commercialized. He earned his BA from Swarthmore College in 1983, and his PhD from UC Berkeley in 1988. After postdocs at Cambridge and Penn, he worked for Exxon for six years before joining the Chemical Engineering faculty at MIT in 1997. He has written or co-authored more than 300 journal articles, which have been cited more than 16,000 times. He is a fellow of the AAAS and of the Combustion Institute, and has received the ACS Glenn Award in Fuel Chemistry and AIChE’s Wilhelm Award in Reaction Engineering. He is the co-director of MIT’s Mobility Systems Center. He previously served as the editor of the International Journal of Chemical Kinetics, as the faculty chair of MIT’s Mobility of the Future project, and as the executive officer of the MIT Department of Chemical Engineering.

Bradford Hager

Cecil and Ida Green Professor of Earth Sciences, MIT Department of Earth, Atmospheric and Planetary Sciences
Bradford Hager earned his PhD from Harvard in 1978, then became a professor at Caltech’s Seismological Laboratory. He joined MIT in 1989 as the Cecil and Ida Green Professor of Earth Sciences in the Department of Earth, Atmospheric and Planetary Sciences. He is former director of the Earth Resources Laboratory and former co-director of the MITEI Center for Carbon Capture, Utilization, and Storage. Hager’s research interests include the relationship among surface deformation, earthquakes, and processes in Earth’s interior. He has expertise on tectonic earthquakes in regional fault systems, as well as deformation and earthquakes induced by human activity. Hager is a fellow of the American Geophysical Union and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. He has been awarded the Macelwane and Lehmann Medals by the American Geophysical Union, the Woollard Award by the Geological Society of America, and the Augustus Love Medal by the European Geophysical Union.

Cameron Halliday

Co-founder and CEO, Mantel
Cameron Halliday is co-founder and CEO of Mantel, a carbon capture start-up based in Boston. At Mantel he is building on his PhD work to develop a radically new approach to carbon capture. Leveraging the unique properties of molten borate salts Mantel’s solution captures CO2 at the high temperatures found inside boilers, kilns, and furnaces, and by doing so, aims to half the cost of carbon capture throughout the industrial sector.

Originally from the UK, Halliday studied chemical engineering at Loughborough University before joining the PhDCEP program at MIT. As a PhD student in the Chemical Engineering department, Halliday developed the newly discovered molten borate chemistry with Professor Alan Hatton and Takuya Harada. After demonstrating the technology at the bench-scale Halliday joined the MBA program at MIT Sloan, where he built the skills to commercialize the discovery and launch Mantel with co-founders Sean Robertson and Danielle Colson. With multiple stints working in industry Halliday combines his passion for science with a determination to use technology to tackle the toughest challenges facing the world today.

Steven Hamburg

Chief Scientist and Senior Vice President, Environmental Defense Fund
Steven Hamburg is chief scientist and senior vice president of the Environmental Defense Fund (EDF) as well as executive manager of MethaneSAT LLC (non-profit subsidiary of EDF). Trained at Vassar College (AB, biology), and Yale University (MFS ecology; PhD, biogeochemistry and ecosystem ecology), he has also held fellowships at Stanford (post-doc, ecology), Harvard (Bullard, mid-career) and Yale (Bass Distinguished Visiting Environmental Scholar). Hamburg was on the faculty of University of Kansas (KU) for nine years followed by 16 years at Brown University, where he led several units; founding director of the Global Environment Program at the Watson Institute for International Studies (Brown), director /interim director of the Environmental Studies Program (KU/Brown), and Environmental Ombudsman (KU). He has published more than 100 scientific papers on biogeochemistry, climate change impacts, carbon/ghg accounting and methane emissions from the oil and gas value chain. He has served as a lead author for the IPCC and was acknowledged as one of the contributing recipients of the 2007 Nobel Peace Prize. He was twice awarded the US EPA Environmental Merit Award from Region 1 for his climate change related work. He is currently chair of UNEP’s International Methane Emissions Observatory’s Science Oversight Committee, a member of the EPA’s Science Advisory Committee, a member of the Division on Earth and Life Sciences of the National Academies of Science, Engineering and Medicine’s Advisory Board, and serves in other advisory capacities.

Charles Harvey

Professor, MIT Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering
Charles Harvey is an experienced leader of international field projects focused on problems in hydrogeology, biogeochemistry, and ecology. He is director of the Mendaram Peatland Field Station in Brunei Darussalam, a unique facility that is providing long-term data on carbon emissions from tropical peat swamp forests. In Bangladesh, he built a field program to study arsenic contamination of well water, a health crisis that threatens millions. He was scientific advisor to the first venture-funded startup to pursue geologic carbon sequestration. He has published widely on issues of carbon sequestration, coastal hydrology, and the physics and chemistry of reactive transport in the subsurface. Harvey has a BA in mathematics from Oberlin College and an MS and PhD in earth science from Stanford University. He has worked for the US Geological Survey, was a faculty member at Harvard University, and is now a professor of Environmental Engineering at MIT. He is a fellow of both the American Geophysical Union and the Geologic Society of America and has received the M. King Hubbert Award for contributions to hydrogeology, the Abdulaziz International Prize for Water, and the Meinzer Award for advancing the science of hydrology.

Howard Herzog

Senior Research Scientist, MIT Energy Initiative
Howard J. Herzog is a senior research engineer at the MIT Energy Initiative (MITEI). He received his undergraduate and graduate education in chemical engineering at MIT. He has industrial experience with Eastman Kodak, Stone & Webster, Aspen Technology, and Spectra Physics. Since 1989, he has been on the MIT research staff, where he works on sponsored research involving energy and the environment, with an emphasis on greenhouse gas mitigation technologies. He was a coordinating lead author for the IPCC Special Report on Carbon Dioxide Capture and Storage (released September, 2005) and a US delegate to the Carbon Sequestration Leadership Forum’s Technical Group (June 2003-September 2007). He was awarded the 2010 Greenman Award by the IEAGHG “in recognition of contributions made to the development of greenhouse gas control technologies.” In 2018, he authored a book entitled Carbon Capture for the MIT Press Essential Knowledge Series.

Michael Howland

Esther and Harold E. Edgerton Assistant Professor, MIT Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering
Michael F. Howland is the Esther and Harold E. Edgerton Assistant Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering at MIT. Previously, he was a postdoctoral scholar at Caltech in the Department of Aerospace Engineering. He received his BS from Johns Hopkins University and his MS from Stanford University. He received his PhD from Stanford University in the Department of Mechanical Engineering. His work is focused at the intersection of fluid mechanics, weather and climate modeling, uncertainty quantification, and optimization and control with an emphasis on renewable energy systems. He uses synergistic approaches including simulations, laboratory and field experiments, and modeling to understand the operation of renewable energy systems, with the goal of improving the efficiency, predictability, and reliability of low-carbon energy generation. He was the recipient of the Robert George Gerstmyer Award, the Creel Family Teaching Award, and the James F. Bell Award from Johns Hopkins University. At Stanford, he received the Tau Beta Pi scholarship, NSF Graduate Research Fellowship, a Stanford Graduate Fellowship, and was awarded as a Precourt Energy Institute Distinguished Student Lecturer. He received the ICTAM Congress Award and he is a fellow of The Royal Geographical Society (with IBG).

Yasheng Huang

Epoch Foundation Professor of Global Economics and Management, MIT Sloan School of Management
Yasheng Huang is Epoch Foundation professor of global economics and management at MIT’s Sloan School of Management. From 2013 to 2017, he served as an associate dean in charge of MIT Sloan’s global partnership programs and its action learning initiatives. His previous appointments include faculty positions at the University of Michigan and at Harvard Business School.

Huang is the author of 11 books in both English and Chinese and of many academic papers and news commentaries. His books, Statism with Chinese Characteristics (Cambridge University Press) and The Rise and the Fall of the EAST: Examination, Autocracy, Stability and Technology in Chinese History and Today (Yale University Press), will be published in 2023. He is collaborating with Chinese academics on a book project, The Needham Question, based on a comprehensive database on Chinese historical inventions and politics.

He is a co-principal investigator on a large-scale multi-disciplinary research project on food safety in China. Huang founded and runs China Lab and India Lab, which have provided low-cost consulting services to hundreds of small and medium enterprises in China and India. From 2015 to 2018, he ran a program in Yunnan province to train women entrepreneurs (funded by Goldman Sachs Foundation). He has held or received prestigious fellowships such as National Fellowship at Stanford University and Social Science Research Council-MacArthur Fellowship. National Asia Research Program named him one of the most outstanding scholars in the United States conducting research on issues of policy importance to the United States. He has served as a consultant at World Bank, Asian Development Bank, and OECD, and serves on advisory and corporate boards of non-profit and for-profit organizations. He is a founding member and is serving as the president of Asian American Scholar Forum, an NGO dedicated to open science, protection of rights and well-being of Asian American scholars.

Abigail Jablansky

Business Development Lead, Amogy
Abigail Jablansky is the business development lead at Amogy, where she is responsible for developing and maintaining strategic partnerships in both the private and public sectors to commercialize Amogy’s novel ammonia-to-energy technology. Prior to joining Amogy, she worked at ExxonMobil for almost nine years at the intersection of manufacturing, logistics, and business in roles including commercial shipping, refinery process engineering, and refinery logistics optimization projects. Her last role at ExxonMobil was in Product Management for all of North America specialty refined products, where she managed regional inventories, logistics, and sales of a $1B+ business line. She holds a BSE in chemical and biomolecular engineering and a minor in mathematics from the University of Pennsylvania.

Robert L. Jaffe

Jane and Otto Morningstar Professor of Science, Post-Tenure, MIT Department of Physics
Robert L. Jaffe is the Jane and Otto Morningstar Professor of Science at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. A theoretical physicist, his research focuses on the physics of elementary particles and quantum field theory, especially the dynamics of quark confinement and the Standard Model. He has served as an advisor to several national laboratories and universities, including as chair of the Science and Engineering Steering Committee of Brookhaven National Laboratory. At MIT, Jaffe has served as chair of the Faculty and director of the Center for Theoretical Physics, and has received many awards for teaching and course development. From 2008 through 2016, Jaffe was a member of the American Physical Society’s Panel on Public Affairs (POPA), which he chaired in 2015. In 2011, Jaffe led a joint POPA/MRS study on Energy Critical Elements: Securing Materials for Emerging Technologies. Together with Professor Washington Taylor, Jaffe developed and taught a new course on The Physics of Energy, which was adopted as a foundational requirement for MIT’s energy minor degree. They have recently published a definitive, award winning textbook on the subject now being used in many courses throughout the world. Earlier this year, Jaffe was awarded the Joseph E. Burton Forum Award of the American Physical Society for his work on physics issues in the public sphere. Jaffe is a fellow the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, the American Association for the Advancement of Science, and the American Physical Society.

Paul Joskow

Elizabeth and James Killian Professor of Economics, MIT Department of Economics; President emeritus; Alfred P. Sloan Foundation
Paul Joskow is the Elizabeth and James Killian Professor of Economics at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) and President emeritus of the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation. Joskow has been on the MIT faculty since 1972, where he was the head of the MIT Department of Economics from 1994 to 1998 and director of the MIT Center for Energy and Environmental Policy Research from 1999 to 2007. Joskow became president of the Sloan Foundation in 2008 and returned to MIT in 2018. At MIT his teaching and research areas include industrial organization, energy and environmental economics, competition policy, and government regulation of industry. He is a past-president of the International Society for New Institutional Economics, a distinguished fellow of the Industrial Organization Society, a distinguished fellow of the American Economic Association, a fellow of the Econometric Society, a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, a fellow of the Econometric Society, and a member of the Council on Foreign Relations. He has served on the boards of the New England Electric System, National Grid PLC, TC Energy, State Farm Indemnity, Exelon Corporation (current), Putnam Mutual Funds, and the Whitehead Institute for Biomedical Research (current).

Namrata Kala

Assistant Professor, Applied Economics, MIT Sloan School of Management
Namrata Kala is an assistant professor in the Applied Economics group at MIT Sloan School of Management. She holds a PhD from Yale University, an MA and MPhil from Yale University, and a BA (hons) degree from Delhi University. She is a Faculty Research Fellow at the National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER), a research affiliate at Bureau for Research and Economic Analysis of Development (BREAD), and a research affiliate at the Abdul Latif Jameel Poverty Action Lab (J-PAL). Prior to joining MIT, she was a Prize Fellow at Harvard University and a postdoctoral fellow at J-PAL. Her primary research interests include development economics and environmental economics.

Michael Kearney

Partner, The Engine
Mike Kearney is a partner at the Engine, where he brings 15 years of operational, research and investing experience in commercializing energy technology.

Kearney’s background combines training in economics and systems engineering with expertise in energy technology, market development, and operational experience as an entrepreneur. Prior to The Engine, Kearney was the executive director of the MIT Roosevelt Project, an interdisciplinary study on energy transition pathways, and was the first employee at a clean-tech startup called Ambri, where he led business development efforts, working with customers in electric power across the United States.

Kearney holds a PhD from MIT Sloan School of Management, where he trained as an economist and his research focused on frictions in the commercialization of science, regulatory barriers to energy innovation, and entrepreneurial strategy. Kearney received an MS in technology and policy from MIT and a BA from Williams College.

David Keith

Gordon McKay Professor of Applied Physics, Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences, and Professor of Public Policy, Harvard Kennedy School
David Keith has worked near the interface between climate science, energy technology, and public policy for twenty-five years. He took first prize in Canada’s national physics prize exam, won MIT’s prize for excellence in experimental physics, and was one of TIME magazine’s Heroes of the Environment. Keith is professor of applied physics at the Harvard School of Engineering and Applied Sciences and professor of public policy at the Harvard Kennedy School, and founder of Carbon Engineering, a company developing technology to capture CO2 from ambient air to make carbon-neutral hydrocarbon fuels. Best known for his work on the science, technology, and public policy of solar geoengineering, Keith led the development of Harvard’s Solar Geoengineering Research Program, a Harvard-wide interfaculty research initiative. His work has ranged from the climatic impacts of large-scale wind power to an early critique of the prospects for hydrogen fuel. Keith’s hardware engineering projects include the first interferometer for atoms, a high-accuracy infrared spectrometer for NASA’s ER-2, and currently, the development of pilot plants for Carbon Engineering and the development of a stratospheric propelled balloon experiment for solar geoengineering. Keith teaches courses on Science and Technology Policy and on Energy and Environmental Systems where he has reached students worldwide with an online edX course. He has writing for the public with A Case for Climate Engineering from MIT Press. Based in Cambridge, Keith spends about a third of his time in Canmore, Alberta.

Christopher Knittel

Deputy Director for Policy, MIT Energy Initiative; George P. Shultz Professor of Energy Economics, MIT Sloan School of Management; Director, MIT Center for Energy and Environmental Policy Research
Christopher Knittel is the George P. Shultz Professor of Energy Economics in the MIT Sloan School of Management. He is also the director of MIT’s Center for Energy and Environmental Policy Research, which has served as the hub for social science research on energy and the environmental since the late 1970s. Knittel is also the deputy director for policy at MITEI and a co-director of The E2e Project, a research initiative between MIT, UC Berkeley, and the University of Chicago, to undertake rigorous evaluation of energy efficiency investments. He joined the faculty at MIT in 2011, having taught previously at UC Davis and Boston University. At MIT, he teaches Energy Economics and Policy to undergraduates, MBA students, and graduate students from outside of the Sloan School of Management.

Timothy Krysiek

Managing Director, Equinor Ventures
Timothy Krysiek works at nexus of energy strategy, venture capital investing, and sustainability. He is passionate about accelerating the energy transition to a net-zero economy. Krysiek is managing director at Equinor Ventures (EV), a corporate venture capital fund. His previous positions at Equinor/Statoil include CEO advisor, corporate strategy & innovation manager, and business development manager. Before joining Statoil, Krysiek was a consultant at Cambridge Energy Research Associates (now part of S&P Global), a researcher at the Oxford Institute for Energy Studies, and a political risk consultant to Google. Krysiek holds degrees from the Fuqua School of Business at Duke University (MBA), the University of Oxford (MSc), the University of St Andrews (MLitt), and Mercyhurst University (BA).

Dharik Mallapragada

Principal Research Scientist, MIT Energy Initiative
Dharik Mallapragada is a principal research scientist at the MIT Energy Initiative. Mallapragada’s current research focuses on advancing energy systems modeling tools to study implications of renewables integration in the power sector, economy-wide electrification, and assessment of emerging energy technologies. He led the systems modeling effort in both the U.S. and emerging market, developing economies contexts for the recently released Future of Energy Storage report, This work was foundational to the economic and policy part in the study. As the chief developer of GenX—a versatile, least-cost optimization platform for planning future electricity systems coupling the mix of generation technologies, transmission additions, and energy storage—his work will be enabling for many other projects going forward. Mallapragada is interested in developing quantitative frameworks to study the economic and environmental outcomes of process and system integration spanning multiple end uses considering climate change and technology evolution. He is also interested in studying new and emerging pathways for electrification of difficult-to decarbonize sectors, such as industrial processes and space heating.

Ernest J. Moniz

Cecil and Ida Green Professor of Physics and Engineering Systems emeritus, MIT; Thirteenth United States Secretary of Energy
Ernest J. Moniz was the thirteenth US Secretary of Energy from 2013 to January 2017, advancing clean energy technology innovation as central to climate change mitigation, nuclear security, and cutting-edge scientific research capabilities. He negotiated the Iran nuclear agreement alongside the Secretary of State.

Moniz joined the Massachusetts Institute of Technology faculty in 1973, founded the MIT Energy Initiative and is the Cecil and Ida Green Professor of Physics and Engineering Systems emeritus. He is CEO of the Nuclear Threat Initiative and of the Energy Futures Initiative. He has served on boards and advisory groups of numerous companies, non-profits, research institutions and government agencies in the energy, science and security arenas.

Moniz received a Bachelor of Science degree summa cum laude in physics from Boston College, a doctorate in theoretical physics from Stanford University and twelve honorary doctorates, including three from European universities. Among his awards are the Grand Cross of the Order of Prince Henry the Navigator (Portugal), the Grand Cordon of the Order of the Rising Sun (Japan), the Distinguished Public Service Award of the Department of Defense, election to the American Philosophical Society, and the inaugural American Academy of Arts and Sciences Award for Excellence in Public Policy and Public Affairs.

Moniz is a resident of Brookline Massachusetts with his wife of almost five decades, Naomi, daughter Katya, and grandchildren Alex and Eve. He is a very modestly accomplished but very enthusiastic practitioner of fly-fishing.

Jennifer Morris

Principal Research Scientist, MIT Energy Initiative and MIT Joint Program on the Science and Policy of Global Change
Jennifer Morris is a principal research scientist at the MIT Joint Program on the Science and Policy of Global Change and at the MIT Energy Initiative. Much of her research focuses on complex adaptive systems, energy transitions, and economic development pathways, as well as uncertainty and decision-making. Morris is a key contributor to the development of the MIT Integrated Global System Modeling (IGSM) framework, focusing on the human system component, the Economic Projection and Policy Analysis (EPPA) model. With this modeling framework, she develops integrated economic and climate scenarios, generates large ensembles, analyzes policy impacts, explores technology and mitigation pathways and transitions, and examines multi-sector dynamics. Her uncertainty-related work involves quantifying key uncertainties and applying different methodological approaches to models in order to formally represent such uncertainties and explore how they impact near-term decisions. A key focus is evaluating risks to different investment options in energy and water and identifying those that are robust to potential risks.

Caitlin Mueller

Associate Professor, MIT Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering and MIT Department of Architecture
Caitlin Mueller is a researcher and educator who works at the creative interface of architecture, structural engineering, and computation. She is currently an associate professor at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology’s Department of Architecture and Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, in the Building Technology Program, where she leads the Digital Structures research group. Her work focuses on new computational design and digital fabrication methods for innovative, high-performance buildings and structures that empower a more sustainable and equitable future. Her research is funded by federal agencies and industry partners, including the National Science Foundation, FEMA, the MIT Tata Center, the Dar Group, Robert McNeel & Associates, and Altair Engineering. Mueller was awarded the ACADIA Innovative Research Award of Excellence by the Association for Computer Aided Design in Architecture in 2021 and the Diversity Achievement Award from the Association of Collegiate Schools of Architecture in 2022.

Fiona Murray

William Porter (1967) Professor of Entrepreneurship, MIT Sloan School of Management; Associate Dean of Innovation and Inclusion, MIT

Meghan L. O’Sullivan

Jeane Kirkpatrick Professor of International Affairs, Harvard University’s Kennedy School; Partner, Macro Advisory Partners
Meghan L. O’Sullivan is the Jeane Kirkpatrick Professor of International Affairs at Harvard University’s Kennedy School and a partner at Macro Advisory Partners, where she is the co-lead of its Energy Transition Practice. She is also the North America chair of the Trilateral Commission. O’Sullivan has extensive experience in policy formulation and in negotiation, including serving as special assistant to President George W. Bush and Deputy National Security Advisor for Iraq and Afghanistan and Vice Chair of the 2013 All Party Talks in Northern Ireland. She is currently a member of Secretary of State Antony Blinken’s Foreign Policy Advisory Board. O’Sullivan is also on the board of Raytheon Technologies and the Council on Foreign Relations. She is also a member of the International Advisory Group for the British law firm Linklaters, and a frequent writer on energy, climate, and foreign policy. She is a trustee of the International Crisis Group and a member of the board of The Mission Continues, a non-profit organization to help veterans. She is also on the advisory committee for the Women’s Initiative at the George W. Bush Institute as well as Columbia University’s Center for Global Energy Policy. For her service in Iraq, O’Sullivan was awarded the Defense Department’s highest honor for civilians and, three times, the State Department’s Superior Honor Award. O’Sullivan was a Luce Scholar in Indonesia and a Henry Crown Fellow. She has a BA from Georgetown University and a masters and doctorate from Oxford University.

Elsa Olivetti

Esther and Harold E. Edgerton Career Development Professor, MIT Department of Materials Science and Engineering; Co-Director, MIT Climate and Sustainability Consortium
Elsa Olivetti is the Esther and Harold E. Edgerton Career Development Professor in the Department of Materials Science and Engineering (DMSE) and co-director of the MIT Climate and Sustainability Consortium at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Her research focuses on reducing the significant burden of materials production and consumption through increased use of recycled and waste materials; informing the early-stage design of new materials for effective scale up; and understanding the implications of policy, new technology development, and manufacturing processes on materials supply chains. Olivetti received her BS degree in engineering science from the University of Virginia in 2000 and her PhD in materials science engineering from MIT in 2007.

Hooisweng Ow

Technology Principal, Eni Next LLC
Hooisweng Ow is a technology principal for Eni Next LLC, the external corporate venture vehicle for Eni S.p.A., with responsibility to identify and evaluate the most promising prospects in Cleantech and advanced energy technology for investment opportunities. Ow’s professional background spans the founding of a nano-biotechnology startup to applied R&D for upstream production and exploration applications. As a founding member of Aramco’s global research center in Boston, she focused on the formation and development of the research portfolio of the Reservoir Engineering Technology Team, where she road-mapped, developed, and deployed multidisciplinary advanced materials chemistry innovations for reservoir monitoring and surveillance from the lab bench to the field. Prior to her career in upstream R&D, Ow was a technologist at a startup who co-developed the earliest formulations of a fluorescent nanomaterials platform currently in a therapeutic clinical trial for FDA Investigational New Drug (IND) approval. She is a co-inventor of 15+ patents and co-author of 20+ peer-reviewed scientific journals.

She holds a BS in ceramic engineering from Alfred University and a PhD in materials science and engineering from Cornell University

Luhut Binsar Pandjaitan

Coordinating Minister for Maritime Affairs and Investment of the Republic of Indonesia
Luhut Binsar Pandjaitan is currently the Coordinating Minister for Maritime and Investment Affairs of the Republic of Indonesia under President Joko Widodo.

Before assuming his current post in July 2016, he was the chief of staff of the President (December 2014-July 2015) and Coordinating Minister for Political, Legal, and Security Affairs (August 2015-July 2016).

Under previous presidencies, Pandjaitan was Indonesian ambassador to Singapore during President Habibie’s term and Minister for Trade and Industry under President Abdurahman Wahid.

Pandjaitan was born on September 28, 1947, in Simargala, North Sumatera. He graduated as the best cadet from the National Military Academy in 1970. He studied public administration at George Washington University, in which he got a master’s degree in public administration. He spent most of his military career in the Kopassus (Army Special Force). He was the first commander of the Kopassus’ 81st antiterrorist detachment. Also, he had various military training both domestic and foreign, including in United Kingdom with SAS, in West Germany with GSG9, and in the U.S. with different Army Special Forces units in Fort Bragg and Fort Benning as well as in the U.S. Army John F Kennedy Special Warfare Center and School during the 1970s and 80s.

In the earlier years of his career, Pandjaitan led Indonesia’s Garuda contingent serving under United Nations in Port Suez, Egypt, in 1974 and ended his military service as the Army’s Education and Training Commander in 1999.

Pandjaitan started his business in 2004 as one of the founders of PT Toba Sejahtera Group, a listed company in the stock exchange. PT Toba Bara Sejahtera has a wide array of business activities, including energy, mining, coal, oil and gas, plantation, and electricity.

Besides his extensive career as a government official, Pandjaitan has a passion for providing the next generation of Indonesians with access to quality education. Together with his wife, in 2001, he established the DEL Institute of Technology and DEL High School in a remote village, Sitoluama, Laguboti District, Toba Regency, North Sumatra. Both are ranked top in the national list.

Pandjaitan has officially been elected as the chairman of the Indonesian Athletics Association (PB PASI) for the period 2021-2025.

John E. Parsons

Deputy Director for Research, MIT Center for Energy and Environmental Policy Research
John Parsons is the deputy director for research at MIT’s Center for Energy and Environmental Policy Research (CEEPR). His research focuses on the valuation and financing of investments in the energy industry, especially those needed for the transition to a low carbon economy, and also on the problems of risk in energy and environment markets. He was a co-director of the recent MIT study on the Future of Nuclear Energy in a Carbon Constrained World and continues to analyze diverse investment options in the nuclear industry. Parsons serves as an associate member of the U.S. CFTC’s Energy and Environmental Markets Advisory Committee and has been a visiting scholar at the U.S. Federal Energy Regulatory Commission. He holds a BA in economics from Princeton University and a PhD in economics from Northwestern University.

Desirée L. Plata

Associate Professor, MIT Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering
Desirée L. Plata is an associate professor in the Department of Civil & Environmental Engineering at MIT. Her research interests include environmental chemistry, environmentally and economically sustainable design, industrially-important processes and materials, energy technologies (fossil and low-carbon), and advanced materials synthesis and manufacture. Plata earned her doctoral degree in chemical oceanography and environmental chemistry from MIT and the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution’s Joint Program in Oceanography (2009) and her bachelor’s degree in chemistry from Union College in Schenectady, NY (2003). Plata is an NSF CAREER Awardee (2016), an Odebrecht-Braskem Sustainable Innovation Awardee (2015), a two-time National Academy of Engineers Frontiers of Engineering Fellow (2012, 2020), a two-time National Academy of Sciences Kavli Frontiers of Science Fellow (2011, 2013), a Caltech Resnick Sustainability Fellow (2017), and winner of MIT’s Junior Bose Teaching Award (2019) and Edgerton Faculty Award (2021). Prior to coming to MIT, Plata served as John J. Lee Assistant Professor of Chemical & Environmental Engineering and associate director for Research at the Center for Green Chemistry and Green Engineering at Yale (2014-2018).

Arvind Sanger

Founder and Managing Partner, Geosphere Capital
Arvind Sanger is the founder of Geosphere Capital, a global long-short fund manager currently investing in Energy Transition equities. Prior to that, between 2002 and 2007, Sanger was a portfolio manager at SAC Capital, running one of the largest equity portfolios and managing a global team based in New York and Singapore. Prior to his tenure at SAC, Sanger had a 15-year career as a top-ranked sell-side oil services and equipment analyst at a number of firms, including Deutsche Bank, DLJ, and Kidder Peabody among others. Sanger graduated from the Indian Institute of Technology, Bombay, with a BTech in 1984 and received his MBA from Tulane University in 1987. Sanger is on the board of the Alexander Hamilton Society, Pratham USA, and Pratham Educational Foundation in India.

Tim Schittekatte

Postdoctoral Associate, MIT Sloan School of Management
Tim Schittekatte is a postdoctoral associate at the MIT Sloan School of Management. He teaches a course on engineering, economics, and regulation of the power sector and conducts research about the same topics within the MIT Energy Initiative. His current research interests are power market design in times of crisis and electricity retail rates for decarbonizing power systems. Prior to joining MIT, he was a research fellow at the Florence School of Regulation at the European University Institute. He graduated as an engineer from Ghent University, Belgium, and completed the EMIN program with an international master in economics. He holds a PhD in energy economics from University Paris-Sud XI.

Richard Schmalensee

Professor of Economics, Emeritus, MIT Department of Economics; Dean and Howard W. Johnson Professor of Management, Emeritus, MIT Sloan School of Management
Richard Schmalensee is Howard W. Johnson Professor of Economics and Management, Emeritus at MIT. He has served as a member of the MIT Energy Council and was director of the MIT Center for Energy and Environmental Policy Research for 12 years. He served as the dean of the MIT Sloan School of Management from 1998 through 2007. He was the member of the President’s Council of Economic Advisers with primary responsibility for energy and environmental policy from 1989 through 1991. Schmalensee has published 11 books and more than 120 articles; his work focuses on industrial organization economics and its policy applications, with a recent focus on energy and environmental policy. With Paul Joskow, he wrote Markets for Power, an important early stimulus to electricity sector restructuring. More recently, he was co-chair of the MIT Energy Initiative study the Future of the Electric Grid and chair of the Future of Solar Energy study, and he was a senior participant in the Future of Energy Storage study. He is a fellow of the Econometric Society and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, a director of the National Bureau of Economic Research, and chairman, Emeritus of the Board of Resources for the Future.

Robert Stoner

Deputy Director for Science and Technology, MIT Energy Initiative
Robert Stoner is the deputy director for science and technology at MITEI and founding director of the MIT Tata Center for Technology and Design. He is currently a member of the MIT Energy Council, the Science and Technology Committee of the U.S. National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), and the Technical Advisory Board of the Center for the Study of Science, Technology, and Energy Policy. He is also a member of the Rockefeller Foundation-funded Global Commission to End Energy Poverty, and serves as its secretary.

Stoner is the inventor of numerous computational and ultrafast optical measurement techniques, and has built and managed successful technology firms in the semiconductor, IT, and optics industries. From 2007 through 2009, he lived and worked in Africa and India while serving in a variety of senior roles within the Clinton Foundation, including as the CEO of the Clinton Development Initiative, and director of the Clinton Climate Initiative for Africa. His present research at MIT focuses on energy storage technology and policy, and the design and optimization of energy systems and business models in the developing world. He earned his Bachelor’s degree in engineering physics from Queen’s University and PhD from Brown University in condensed matter physics.

Yogesh Surendranath

Associate Professor, MIT Department of Chemistry
Yogesh (Yogi) Surendranath is an associate professor of Chemistry at MIT. He holds dual bachelor’s degrees in chemistry and physics from the University of Virginia and a PhD in inorganic chemistry from MIT obtained under the direction of Professor Daniel Nocera. As part of his graduate work, he investigated the mechanism oxygen evolution catalysis by oxidic cobalt-based materials. After receiving his PhD, Surendranath undertook postdoctoral studies as a Miller Research Fellow at UC Berkeley under the direction of Professor Paul Alivisatos. In the summer of 2013, he assumed his current position at MIT. His research group aims to store renewable electricity in energy-dense chemical bonds by controlling interfacial reactivity at the molecular level. Surendranath has authored over 50 publications and is the recipient of numerous awards including the Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineer, E. Bright Wilson Prize, NSF CAREER award, a DOE Young Investigator Award, an Air Force Young Investigator Award, a Toyota Young Investigator Award from The Electrochemical Society, an Alfred P. Sloan Foundation Fellowship, and the Cottrell Scholar Award.

Timothy Swager

John D. MacArthur Professor of Chemistry, MIT Department of Chemistry
Timothy M. Swager is the John D. MacArthur Professor of Chemistry at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. A native of Montana, he received a BS from Montana State University in 1983 and a PhD from the California Institute of Technology in 1988. After a postdoctoral appointment at MIT, he was on the chemistry faculty at the University of Pennsylvania 1990-1996 and returned to MIT in 1996 as a professor of Chemistry and served as the head of Chemistry from 2005-2010. He has published more than 500 peer-reviewed papers and more than 120 issued/pending patents. Swager’s honors include: election to the National Academy of Sciences, an honorary Doctorate from Montana State University, National Academy of Inventors Fellow, the Pauling Medal, the Lemelson-MIT Award for Invention and Innovation, election to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, the American Chemical Society Award for Creative Invention, the American Chemical Society Award in Polymer Chemistry, the Christopher Columbus Foundation Homeland Security Award, and the Carl S. Marvel Creative Polymer Chemistry Award (ACS). Swager’s research interests are in design, synthesis, and study of organic-based electronic, sensory, energy harvesting, membrane, high-strength, liquid crystalline, and colloid materials. He has founded five companies (DyNuPol, Iptyx, PolyJoule, C¬2 Sense and Xibus Systems) and has served on a number of corporate and government boards.

Kripa K. Varanasi

Professor, MIT Department of Mechanical Engineering
Kripa K. Varanasi is a professor of Mechanical Engineering at MIT. He received his BTech from IIT Madras, India and his SM (ME and EECS) and PhD from MIT. Prior to joining MIT as a faculty member, Varanasi was a lead researcher and project leader at the GE Global Research Center. At GE he received many awards for his work including Best Patent, Best Technology Project, and Leadership Award. At MIT, the focus of his work is in understanding the physico-chemical phenomena at interfaces and developing novel materials, devices, and products that can dramatically enhance performance in energy, water, agriculture, transportation, medical, and consumer devices. He is passionate about entrepreneurship and translating technologies from lab to market. He has co-founded multiple companies including LiquiGlide, Dropwise, Infinite Cooling, and Everon24. Time and Forbes Magazines have named LiquiGlide to their “Best Inventions of the Year.” His Infinite Cooling project has won first prize at DOE’s National Cleantech University Prize, first prize Rice Business Plan Competition, first prize Harvard Business School Energy & Environment Start-up, first prize at MIT-100K, and first prize at MassChallenge. Varanasi has received numerous awards for his work: NSF Career Award, DARPA Young Faculty Award, SME Outstanding Young Manufacturing Engineer Award, ASME Bergles-Rohsenow Heat Transfer Award, Boston Business Journal’s 40 under 40, ASME Gustus L. Larson Memorial Award for outstanding achievements in mechanical engineering, APS Milton van Dyke award, and MIT Graduate Student Council’s Frank E. Perkins Award for Excellence in Graduate Advising.

Louis Vézina

Head of Market Intelligence and Expertise, Hydro-Québec
Louis Vézina is head of market intelligence and expertise within Hydro-Quebec’s trading and marketing division. He oversees the planning of the company’s sales of energy, capacity, and environmental attributes on export markets. He also manages a team of experts responsible for economic analysis and regulatory affairs geared towards the company’s wholesale market activities.

Vézina joined Hydro-Quebec International in 1995 as a country risk analyst before moving to the strategic planning department of Hydro-Quebec. In 2000, he joined the company’s trading floor where he held different positions such as market analyst, power scheduler, senior trader, and manager of the hedging strategy for the unit. He has been in his current managerial position since 2016.

Vézina holds a Master’s degree in economics from Birbeck College (University of London).

Stuart Watson

Chief Adviser, Office of the Chief Scientist, Development and Technology, Rio Tinto
Stuart Watson has 25 years of experience in corporate and business unit leadership roles across Metals & Mining, Oil and Chemicals and is responsible for coordinating the execution of Rio Tinto’s technology and R&D program.

He has a background in strategy development and its delivery through transformative projects across production, supply chain, sales & marketing, procurement, technology, and M&A.

With extensive experience leading corporate price and economic forecasting across bulk commodities and chemicals, Watson has been with Rio Tinto.

Libby Wayman

Partner, Breakthrough Energy Ventures
Libby Wayman is a partner at Breakthrough Energy Ventures, an investor-led fund created to accelerate the transition to clean energy and a decarbonized economy. Prior to BEV, Wayman led clean technology development at GE where she served as the global director of Innovation for GE’s Ecomagination strategy, where GE invested over $10B in clean technology and generated over $200B in revenue. Wayman also served as the director of the US Department of Energy’s Clean Energy Manufacturing Initiative, which included clean energy manufacturing tax credits (48C), and new research programs and institutes for advanced manufacturing for clean energy technologies. Wayman began her career in entrepreneurship and technology development, including establishing a company that develops and supplies equipment to the dairy cold chain in India, and research and development in solar at SunPower and Alion Energy. Wayman holds a bachelor of science in civil and environmental engineering from MIT, and a master of science in mechanical engineering at MIT, where she co-founded the MIT Energy & Climate Club. Wayman currently teaches MIT’s Climate & Energy Ventures course.